Friday, January 29, 2010

Today Is My THIRD (!!!) Blogiversary

Can you believe it? Three whole years of having this virtual online community for Dinner.
I hope you've been entertained and I hope I've left you smiling, or thinking, or both.
So much has happened in those three years.
I've made so many new friends through this blog and I've learned many new things. I've enjoyed having many of you to "actual" dinners as well. I hope to continue all of this.
Even if you've never commented before, please consider leaving a comment on this special day. I know you're enjoying the blog because you keep coming back, but actually writing something helps give me the encouragement to continue.



20 comments:

Leora said...

Mazel tov! Three is a good number. Ad mayeh v'esrim, at least. And then some.

ProfK said...

Mazal Tov on turning three! Some homes (like your blog) are so warm and welcoming that guests love returning there time after time. Keep "cooking" up those posts and I'll be waiting on the blog doorstep to enjoy them.

Gavi said...

mazal tov! Keep the posts coming! Like I wrote you a while back, your blog is "reverently irreverent" and a very fun read!

Anonymous said...

congrats. i really love your blog. not to sound crazy/stalkerish. but you really give me a great fresh view of the individuals in the breurs community. it is so refreshing to see a jewish mother so excited for the chagim/shabbat/guests. you inspired me to make a tubshvat themed meal this week! please continue writing and sharing your love of cooking/hosting. you have really kept this (now older single and bit bitter) UWS girl inspired!

Yekkishe Bekishe said...

So when is the Upsheren? BTW, the Yalkut Shimoni - a Rav in FFam during the 13th century - is the earliest mentions of the custom of Upsheren at the age of 3. You can find it in Parshas kedoshim by the Parsha of Orloh!

G6 said...

Leora,
ProfK,
Gavi,
Anonymous -

It is comments like these that make me feel that the blog is truly a truly worthwhile endeavor.

ProfK - Your poetic use of the English language onces again warms my heart.

Gavi - I don't recall you saying that before. Thanks for reiterating :)

Anonymous - You've touched me deeply. You don't sound stalkerish at ALL. In fact, I'd love to have you to dinner ;)

Shosh said...

happy blogoversary!

harry-er than them all said...

bekkishe- you should see what freud wrote about the upsherin (something to do with oedipus coplex and that the mother had to hide the child so that the father wouldn't kill his competition)

YDL said...

MT - Upsherin has naught to do with yeks!

Anonymous said...

HAPPY BLOGIVERSARY!! 3 YEARS OLD...you're a BIG girl now!!

Kathrin said...

Happy blogiversary :-)

Something Different said...

Three? Whoa, that's a lot.

Very creative of you to use a cake like that. ;-)

Mazel tov!

itsagift said...

Happy Blogiversary!

May you have many more!

I like the way you make the shabbos table so warm and welcoming with all your guests and I love the pictures on your sidebar...and your blog! It's great!

SuperRaizy said...

Congratulations! You are one of those people who help make the blogosphere a friendly place to hang out. Looking forward to 3 more years!

Anonymous said...

mazel tov. love your blog. keep it up

Yekkishe Bekishe said...

The source for the Minhag is a Rav of FFam. That can't be denied or refuted. Whether it is a Yekkisher Minhog or not, I can't be sure. Just because Rabbi Hamburger doesn't discuss it in his Seforim, doesn't automatically make it pasul.

YDL said...

And what makes you think he doesn't discuss it??

Upsherin not an Ashkenazic minhog said...

'Yekkishe bekishe' (is that an oxymoron by the way? :) -

The Yalkut Shimoni does not mention the Sepharadic/Hassidic custom of upsherin. What he does mention is something else, namely the idea of starting a young boy in limud haTorah at the age of three. There is no mention there in the YS of haircutting. The haircutting thing is a later addition, seemingly from non-Jewish sources originally (various non-Jewish cultures have customs connected to haircutting. One prominent example is Hindus, who are known for their upsherins, which brought about the Indian sheitel crisis a while ago), which some Hassidim have attempted to graft on to the earlier Jewish minhag.

So the upsherin custom is not Yekkish and not Ashkenazic, and not originally Jewish bichlal.

P.S. It is discussed at length in Shorshei Minhag Ashkenaz III, credit to which is due for some of the above.

Jacob Da Jew said...

Mazal Tov and Kudos for keeping it up for so long.

YW said...

Happy blogiversary